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Jul 28 2015

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domain privacy?

Over the past few months or so I have bought myself a bunch of new domain names (I collect ’em….). On some of those names I have chosen the option of “domain privacy” so that the whois record for the domain in question will show limited information to the world at large. I don’t often do this, for a couple of reasons. Firstly, I usually don’t much care whether or not the world at large knows that I own and manage a particular domain (I have over a dozen of these). Secondly, the privacy provided is largely illusory anyway. Law Enforcement Agencies, determined companies with pushy lawyers and network level adversaries will always be able to link any domain with the real owner should they so choose. In fact, faced with a simple DMCA request, some ISPs have in the past simply rolled over and exposed their customer’s details.

But, I get spam to all the email addresses I advertise in my whois records, and I also expose other personal details required by ICANN rules. I don’t much like that, but I put up with it as a necessary evil. However, for one or two of the new domains I don’t want the world and his dog attributing the name directly to me – at least not without some effort anyway.

Because the whois record must contain contact details, domain privacy systems tend to mask the genuine registrant email address with a proxy address of the form “some-random-alphanumeric-string@dummy.domain” which simply redirects to the genuine registrant email address. Here is one obvious flaw in the process because a network level adversary can simply post an email to the proxy address and then watch where it goes (so domain privacy is pointless if your adversary is GCHQ or NSA – but then if they are your adversaries you have a bigger problem than just maintaining privacy on your domain).

Interestingly, I have received multiple emails to each of the proxy addresses listed for my “private” domains purporting to come from marketing companies offering me the chance to sign up to various special offers. Each of those emails also offers me the chance to “unsubscribe” from their marketing list if I am not interested in their wares.

I’ll leave the task of spotting the obvious flaw in that as an exercise for the class.

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